Origami Heaven

A paperfolding paradise

The website of writer and paperfolding designer David Mitchell

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The Pig
 
This page attempts to record what is known about the origin and history of the origami designs known as the Pig. Please contact me if you know any of this information is incorrect or if you have any other information that should be added. Thank you.

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In Japan

In his article 'History of Origami in the East and the West before Interfusion', published in 'Origami 5: Fifth International Meeting of Origami, Science, Mathematics and Education' in 2011, Koshiro Hatori asserts that, ''Many of the European origami models contained in Krause-Boelte's book (ie 'The Kindergarten Guide') are not included in contemporary Japanese records. The pig, house, sofa (also known as piano or organ), balloon (waterbomb), arrow (paper plane), salt cellar (cootie catcher), bird (pajarita or cocotte) and windmill ... were all born in Europe and imported into Japan along with the kindergarten system.'

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1931

As far as I know the first publication of the Pig in Japan is in 'Origami (Part 1)' by Isao Honda, which was first published in 1931.

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In Western Europe / USA

1873

As far as I know this design first appears in the historical record as 'Schweinchen' in 'Die Praxis Des Kindergartens' by Auguste Koehler, which was published by Herman Bohlau in Weimar in 1873.

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1882

The design also appears in part two of 'The Kindergarten Guide' by Maria Kraus Boelte and John Kraus, which was probably first published by E. Steiger and Company in New York in 1882.

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1896

The Pig is pictured, but not named, in Eleonore Heerwart's 'Course in Paperfolding' was first published in Dutch in 1895 then in English by Charles and Dible in London and Glasgow in 1896.

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In their book 'Froebel's Occupations', published by Houghton, Mifflin and Company, of Boston and New York in 1896, Kate Douglas Wiggin and Nora Archibald Smith write: 'There is a sequence of simple figures, all life-forms, and all folded so as to stand erect upon the table, which we call the 'Pig' sequence, and which we have found very useful before the folding of symmetrical forms is begun. ... We call the forms successively, the large tent, the snow bank or hillside, the horse-car, the small tent, the table, the card-case, the fireplace, the box, the two canoes, the salt-cellar, the wood basket and finally the pig, - the crowning glory of the sequence, a star of the purest ray and the first magnitude.'

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1897

The Pig also appears in Lois Bates' 'Kindergarten Guide', which was first published by Longmans, Green and Co in London in 1897.

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1900

A drawing of the Pig also appears in Die Frobelschen Beschaftigungen: Das Falten' by Marie Muller-Wunderlich, which was published by Friedrich Brandstetter in Leipzig in 1900.

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The Pig also appears in:

1932

Booklet 1 of 'Images a Plier', a series of 6 booklets published by Librairie Larousse in Paris in 1932.

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Booklet 2 of 'Figuras de Papel', a series of 3 booklets published by B Bauza in Barcelona in 1932.

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1936

Margaret Campbell's 'Paper Toy Making' published in 1936, although in this case a cut is used to create a wiggly tail. This cut may be one of Margaret Campbell's own creative contributions.

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1939

'El Mundo de Papel' by Dr Nemesio Montero, which was published by G Miranda in Edicions Infancia in Valladolid in 1939

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1940

As 'Cerdito' in 'El Plegado y Cartonaje en la Escuela Primaria' by Antonio M Luchia and Corina Luciani de Luchia, which was published by Editorial Kapelusz in Buenos Aires in 1940.

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1949

'Au Pays des Mains Agiles', which was published by Editions Fleurus in Paris in 1949.

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1956

'Paper Magic' by Robert Harbin, which was published by Oldbourne in London in 1956

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