The Public Paperfolding History Project

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The Paperfolding of Frederic G Rohm
 

Introduction

Frederic G Rohm was born in 1907.

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Chronology

1963

Vol 3: Issue 2 of the Origamian for Spring / Summer 1963 contains a profile of Fred Rohm, written by Peter Van Note, which includes an illustration of 'Fred's Fabulous Flower', a one piece, colour-changed design of a flower in a pot.

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The same issue also contains diagrams for five designs from the Simplex Base: Chick / Kitten and Puppy / Scottie / Chick-A-Dee / Squirrel / Gardener (with wheelbarrow)

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1963

Vol 3: Issue 4 of the Origamian for Winter 1963/4 contains an article by Fred Rohm, 'On Cutting'.

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The same issue also contains a report on the second 'Annual Get-together' mentioning some designs shown by Rohm:

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'The Best of Origami' by Samuel Randlett, which was published by E P Dutton in New York in 1963 and by Faber and Faber Ltd in London in 1964, contained the following biographical details:

And diagrams for a number of Rohm's original designs:

Squirrel

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Skunk

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Turkey

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Halloween Cat (Cut)

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Whistler's Mother

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Star Flowers

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1964

Vol 4: Issue 2 of 'The Origamian' for Summer 1964 contains a follow-up article 'More About Cutting' by Fred Rohm:

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Vol 4: Issue 3 of 'The Origamian' for Autumn 1964 contains an article by Fred Rohm titled 'On Animated Folding' ie what we would now call action designs, which mentions several action folds designed by Fred Rohm himself ...

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Vol 4: Issue 4 of 'The Origamian' for Winter 1964 contains a report on the Second Origami Convention by Alice Gray, which mentions some new designs taught by Fred Rohm:

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'Secrets of Origami', by Robert Harbin, which was published by Oldbourne Book Company in London in 1964, contained diagrams for a number of Rohm's designs:

See-Saw

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Circus Pony (Cut)

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Circus Elephant

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Rohm's Pig

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Snuffy the Bear

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Hippopotamus

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It's Magic

From a 2x1 rectangle

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Performing Seal

From a 3x1 rectangle

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Vera Cruz

From a 3x1 rectangle

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Santa Claus

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1965

Vol 5: Issue 1 of 'The Origamian' for Spring 1965 included an article by Fred Rohm, 'On the Secret of Copying', about what we would now call reverse-engineering.

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Vol 5: Issue 2 of 'The Origamian' for Summer 1965 included an article by Fred Rohm, 'On Bases', which argues that the concept of bases is unnecessary but also contains some interesting information about Fred Rohm, Jack Skillman and the way the concept of bases evolved. Only the latter is reproduced here:

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1966

'The Origamian' Vol 6: Issue 1 of Spring 1966 contains an article by Fred Rohm, 'On Folding Paper and Preparation', about the cutting of squares which, inter alia, mentions the use of Krylon to coat paper and the use of metal foil.

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Volume 6, Issue 3 of 'The Origamian' for Autumn 1966 contains an article by Fred Rohm, 'On Mobiles', the extracts of which, below, mention Giuseppe Baggi and metal foil:

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Volume 6, Issue 4 of 'The Origamian' for Winter 1966 contains an article about the Fourth Annual American Origami Convention, which reported that:

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1969

Vol 9: Issue 1 of 'The Origamian' for Spring 1969 contained an article 'On Money Folds', written by Fred Rohm, which contains mention of several of his money fold designs:

(The reference to 'Star Flowers' being published in 'Secrets of Origami' is incorrect. It was in fact published in 'The Best of Origami' by Samuel Randlett.)

The same issue also contained diagrams for Rohm's Stag (from a dollar bill):

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Vol 9: Issue 4 of 'The Origamian' for Winter 1969 contains an article, 'On Bonus Folds' by Fred Rohm, which mentions a number of designs by Rohm.

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Rohm's 'Robin' appeared in Issue 4 of the 'Flapping Bird':

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Rohm's 'Puss In Boots' appeared in Issue 7 of the 'Flapping Bird':

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1971

Rohm's 'Stag' (Cut) appeared in Issue 15 of the 'Flapping Bird': The text says 'This Stag is the strongest possible argument for the validity of cuts.'

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