Origami Heaven

A paperfolding paradise

The website of writer and paperfolding designer David Mitchell

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Manuel Pratique de Jardins D'Enfants de Friedrich Froebel - 1859
 
This book was compiled by J F Jacobs and published in Brussells and Paris in 1859.

The text of a chapter on Pliage (paperfolding) in this book contains two lists of designs. Unfortunately there are no pictures accompanying the text to help in identifying the designs listed. Some of the designs can be identified with some certainty by reference to other works, particularly 'The Kindergarten Guide' by Maria Kraus Boelte and John Kraus, which was published in 1877, 'The Kindergarten Principle' by Mary J Lyschinska, which was published in 1880, and which, despite their later date, seems to contain mostly the same designs in the same order, and 'De Kleine Papierwerkers' by Elise Van Calcar, which was published at the earlier date of 1863. Other designs remain unidentified at this time.

The illustrations below are from 'The Kindergarten Guide' unless otherwise stated.

The names in bold type are the standard names by which the design is referred to throughout this site.

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List 1:

This list appears to be of designs based on the double blintz basic form or the windmill base which Lysinschka calls 'the first ground form'.

1. La salière (the Saltcellar).

2. La poivrière (the Pepperpot - ie the salt-cellar with the corners folded inside).

3. Le sac de voyage (the Travel Bag).

4. La fleur (the Flower - ie the Saltcellar with the centre flattened).

5. La fleur avec étoile (the Flower with Star).

Lyschinska explains how to fold the Flower then says '20. Another Flower: - Find a slight variation of No 19.' No illustration of this design is given and it does not seem to occur elsewhere in the Froebelian literature. Bringing the internal flaps inwards and upwards would create a star shape in the centre of the flower and it seems to me that this is the most likely possibility.

6. La chemisette (the Short-Sleeved Shirt).

Lyschinska simply says '21. The Chemisette: - Flatten the above' (ie the Flower with Star). No illustration of this design is given and it does not seem to occur elsewhere. I have not been able to reconstruct the appearance of this design.

A design called 'Het chemisetje' can be found in 'De Kleine Papierwerkers' by Elise Van Calcar but although it directly follows the flower in her sequence I cannot see how it can be related. It does not seem to be developed from either the double blintz basic form or the windmill base and so, despite its position in the sequence, appears to be an entirely different design.

7. Le cerf-volant (the Kite - developed from the windmill base).

8. La sèche (the Cigarette).

This design does not occur in Kraus -Boelte or Lysinska and I have not been able to definitively identify it from any other source.

9. Le moulin à vent (the Windmill).

10. La table (the Table - developed from the windmill base).

Neither Kraus-Boelte nor Lyschinska mention this design although they both include the tablecloth which is very similar.

Illustration from 'Des Kindes Erste Beschaftigungsbuch' by E Barth and W Niederley

11. Le porte-cigares (the Cigar Case - developed from the windmill base).

12. Le vaisseau à voiles (the Boat with Sail - developed from the windmill base).

This design is in Calcar and Lyschinska but not in Kraus-Boelte. The Illustration is from Lyschinska.

13. Le pot à fleurs (the Vase - developed from the windmill base).

This design is not in Kraus-Boelte. Lyschinska gives no illustration but there is one in 'De Kleine Papierwerkers' by Elise Van Calcar.

14. L'oiseau (the bird - probably the Cocotte or Pajarita).

15. Le double bateau (the Double Boat - developed from the windmill base).

16. La barque du pécheur (fishing boat - the Boat with Fish Box)

17. Le double réservoir pour les poissons (double tanks for fish - the the Portfolio)

18. La grande boite (the Open Box)

19. Le cadre (the Frame - made by flattening the Open Box).

20. La boite solide (the Solid Box - made by pulling out paper hidden in the corners of the frame).

This design is an example of what in more modern times has become known as an un-unfoldable box.

21. Le miroir (the Mirror - made by folding back two edges of the Picture Frame).

Illustration from Lyschinska.

22. La gondole (the Gondola).

23. La gondole avec des bancs (the gondola with benches). If I am right about the designs in the sequence leading up to this point then this item in the list appears to be an error ... since there are no flaps to pull out to change the form to add benches to the design.

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List 2:

This list appears to be designs based on the triple blintz basic form or the blintzed windmill base ( a windmill base folded on to from a square of paper which has already been blintzed). Lysinschka calls this 'the second ground form'.

1. Le ridicule (ridicule).

I cannot identify this design from any other source. However, on the basis that the title could be interpreted to mean 'fool' or 'clown' it is tempting to speculate whether this could possibly be the design known in the Japanese tradition as Yakkosan, which is made by turning three of the flaps of the triple blintz basic form into rectangles.

2. Le manchon (the Muff).

3. La paire de bottes (pair of boots) - the Pair of Boots - which can be made by folding the design pictured above in half and in half again.

The design is seen to better effect in the illustration below which is taken from 'Die Frobelschen Beschaftigungen: Das Falten' by Marie Muller-Wunderlich.

4. La veste du mineur (child's jacket - the Jacket from the suit of clothes).

5. Le pantalon (trousers - the Trousers from the suit of clothes).

6. Le chapeau (the Hat).

A hat can be made by folding the cross in half downwards. If this is the design intended it seems misplaced in the sequence here. Lyschinska has the hat after the Cross (from which it is made) and before the Jacket and says '4. Hat:- Fold the cross into half.' No illustration of this design is given and the Hat does not seem to occur elsewhere in the literature. However the same design occurs, upside down, in 'Pleasant Work for Busy Fingers' by Maggie Browne, published in London in 1896, as the Short Jacket.

7. La croix (the cross).

8. La croix d'honneur

I cannot identify this design from any other source.

9. Le porte-cigares

This design has the same name as no 11 in the first list. I presume that it is the same form but folded from a blintzed (rather than a normal) windmill base.

10. id. (same)

Presumably two different versions of this design are possible. If so I cannot identify the difference between them.

11. Le double bateau (the Double Hulled Boat - ie the Double Boat folded from a blintzed windmill base)

This design has the same name as no 15 in the first list. I presume that it is the same form but folded from a blintzed (rather than a normal) windmill base. It is worth noting that while Plate II of Eleonore Heerwart's 'Course in Paperfolding', published in 1895, shows a double boat, Plate III shows a second double boat in a smaller size. Presumably, as here, one is folded from a standard windmill base and one from a blintzed windmill base.

12. La garde-robe (possibly the Corner Cupboard)

This design does not occur in Kraus-Boelte or Lyschinska and I have been unable to definitively identify it from any other source. It is possibly the Corner Cupboard which occurs in a similar position in the sequence in Calcar (see image below) and can also be found in Lois Bates' 'Kindergarten Guide', which was published in London in 1897. It's position in this list is problematical since, while it can be developed from a blintzed windmill base it can more easily be developed from a standard windmill base.

13. La boite fermée (the Closed Box)

This design does not occur in Lyschinska and I have been unable to definitively identify it from any other source.

14. Le compteur (probably the Sofa)

This design does not occur in Lyschinska and I have been unable to definitively identify it from any other source. It is possibly the Sofa which occurs in a similar position in the sequence in Calcar (see image below) and can also be found in Lois Bates' 'Kindergarten Guide', which was published in London in 1897.

15. La lettre à deux cachets (the Letter with Two Stamps)

This design does not occur in Lyschinska and I have been unable to definitively identify it from any other source.

16. Le cadre (the Picture Frame)

This is the picture frame made by collapsing the sides of the Junk Box. This design is not illustrated in Kraus-Boelte or Lyschinska but its appearance is very similar to the Picture Frame above.

17. Le miroir (the Looking Glass)

This is the mirror made by folding two sides of the Junk Box Picture Frame backwards in preparation for developing the Chinese Junk. This design is not illustrated in Kraus-Boelte or Lyschinska but its appearance is very similar to the Mirror above.

18. La boîte (the Junk Box)

In this context this can only be the box developed from the blintzed windmill base double boat that the Chinese Junk is then in turn developed from. This design is misplaced in the sequence here. It ought to come before the Junk Box Picture Frame as in Lyschinska.

19. La gondole simple (the Gondola - from a blintzed windmill base )

This is the Chinese Junk without the 'sails' raised.

20. La gondole avec roues (the Gondola with Wheels)

This design is not in Kraus-Boelte or Lyschinska and I have been unable to identify it from any other source.

21. La gondole à voiles (the Chinese Junk)

22. La gondole fermée (the closed gondola)

This design is not in Kraus-Boelte or Lyschinska and I have been unable to identify it from any other source.